BOBBY BURNS COCKTAIL: A WARMING WHISKY TALE

Perhaps it’s fitting that a cocktail be named after Scotland’s national poet – Robert Burns. After all, Scotch is arguably the country’s most significant contribution to the world. The drink is said to have originated during the early part of 20th century at the famed Waldorf Bar on New York’s 5th Avenue.

A number of lyrics by Scotland’s national poet form part of the drinking songs repertoire across the English speaking world. In fact, modern singers like Bobby Vinton, Luke Kelly or Dropkick Murphys seem to be carrying forward his rich and enviable legacy.

Though the constituents are rumoured to have changed over the years, malt whiskey remains the mainstay. One can however substitute Benedictine with Absinthe or Drambuie.

Ingredients

  • Single malt – 75ml
  • Vermouth – 30ml Benedictine – 15ml
  • FOR GARNISH: Shortbread cookie
  • Single malt – 75ml
  • Vermouth – 30ml Benedictine – 15ml
  • FOR GARNISH: Shortbread cookie

The Process

Fill a martini shaker with ice and add in all the ingredients.

Shake the container well, for at least 30 seconds.

Strain the contents into a chilled martini glass.

Garnish with a shortbread cookie and enjoy!


No-Bake Bourbon Balls

While it might not be possible for us to prepare a full course meal every single day, we can of course keep ready a few easy-to-make n’ serve snacks that can be paired with almost anything. So the no-bake bourbon balls are your savior. This means you don’t have to say goodbye to your visitors without treating them to something they would absolutely love.

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JAMESON WHISKEY BLUE CHEESE CHICKEN BURGER

Nothing makes a burger better when adding blue cheese, but now you've got double the cheesy goodness plus this rich whisky glaze that lets the golden flavour of the liquor come out and play.

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What a Clootie Pie!

Scotsmen love their clootie dumplings. It is a traditional pudding, one that is a must-have during Christmas and Hogmanay with a gracious serving of custard. These dumplings are actually a spiced pudding, stuffed with dried fruits, wrapped in a cloth, and simmered in water for a long time. Clootie dumplings are an experimental version of plum cakes, however, they aren’t quite as rich. Traditionally, these dumplings do not involve whisky as an ingredient. But can you really imagine Scottish holidays without whisky?Clooties, or cloth pieces have been used as a cooking instrument for the longest time. It has died out in most parts of the world, but the Scots like lingering onto traditions. Boiling in a clootie gives a skin like character to the outer side of a dumpling. Often people would leave the dumpling out to dry so as to let it form a crust on the outside. However, the oven does that job today on its own. For a true Scottish touch invoking strains of the legendary bagpipes, use 100 Pipers for the recipe.

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